(Rules for) Living Life on the Lime (515)

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A. Appreciate the rain. Other people have so much more or less of it than they need. Just appreciate yours.

B. Remember to use I-statements when expressing your discomfort with someone else.

  1. Example: “I feel angry because you ate all the pie, dude!”
  2. Example: “I feel happy because I scored three goals on that group of children, which means I win.”
  3. Example: “When you poke me in the side, I feel tickled.”
  4. And so on.

C. Consider the consequences of your actions.

  1. Like if you eat too many blueberries and spinach, it might give you the runs.
  2. Or if you get into the shower with your glasses on, they might get wet.

D. Re-use zip-lock bags.

E. There can never be too many raspberries or blueberries, despite what I said earlier.

F. Trust yourself.

 

In Which There Is a New Job and Popcorn

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I made maple and brown sugar sauce with coconut oil for popcorn yesterday and it was incredible. I also paid enough attention to the Oscars to know that Anna Hathaway is weirdly widely hated and Adele is weirdly widely loved — at least according to Twitter, that the Onion may have issued it’s first-ever retraction after making a stupid wise crack about the most adorable child actor yet to be sucked in by Hollywood, and that the same Quvenzhané was also subjected to weird sexualization by MacFarlane who declared it would be 16 years before she would be too old for George Clooney. My conclusion: weird.

Then this morning there was Starbucks, coffee, and re-hashing of things I used to know how to do but don’t really know how to do any more. Without a doubt, I am a happy camper to be opening, but I have a feeling that I will be craving more than one 2 pm nap in the weeks to come. Unfortunately, 2 pm is about the mid-hour of job number two, so I’ll have to quell those urges, at least for the time being.

I made more popcorn tonight and used brewer’s yeast on it that I think was mislabeled (#annoying) because it’s not yellow and flakey the way it’s supposed to be.

It’s amazing how studying writing or reading closely as a part of your main employment will make you rethink every word you choose when you are the one writing. And rethink grammatical structure. And rethink metaphors, mixed or well-constructed though they may be. Even beginning a sentence with the phrase “It’s amazing how…” starts to annoy me. Like it’s too tawdry or something. Too tired.

However, writing begets better writing, at least from what I can tell, and so… I shall write.

And you may even see a transition to substance sometime soon.

But I won’t make promises, because that would be calling it a comeback a little too soon, I think😉

I might owe my Dad a post on the New Girl. I’ll think about it.

And we can’t go on without Rules. Watch for that.

Explorations of Getting Sore and Writing Blogs, with a Title Nearly Longer Than the Post Itself

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One of my favorite things about working out is getting sore and feeling sore the next day, except that that also reminds me that I’m out of shape. On the other hand, if I don’t feel sore, I feel like I didn’t work out hard enough. It’s the worst catch 22 ever.

I have still not read “Catch-22.” It should be next on my list. I know approximately five people who declare it is their favorite book.

One of my favorite things about writing a blog post is seeing the little “12-hour hit monitor” go skyrocketing in the first hour after I post. It makes me feel important and loved and funny. On the other hand, about six hours later, I stop getting more than three or four hits in any given hour and then I feel sad, like I’m just a flash in the pan.

According to “The Phrase Finder,” the phrase ‘a flash in the pan,’ may derive from the California gold rush. It means either something that is disappointing in that it builds expectations and fails to meet them or something that occurs once and quickly (depending on whether you trust the free online dictionary or the Phrase Finder). More likely than California, the phrase probably originates from Flintlock muskets, which apparently sometimes flashed (lit up the gun powder) without actually firing a bullet. All very interesting but entirely unrelated to blog posting, from what I can tell.

Somehow, I’m talking about all of this because my arms and abs are aching. Awesome.

(Rules for) Living Life on the Lime (565)

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A. Sing along.

B. Complete tasks you planned to complete.

  1. Don’t freak out if it’s not on exactly the right timeline — flexibility is good.
  2. But quit procrastinating.

C. Sometimes it is hard to understand what people are saying, but that doesn’t mean it won’t be interesting if you figure it out.

  1. For example: “Make Me Proud” by Drake featuring Nicki Minaj is good, but what is Nicki Minaj actually saying? I think there are words missing.

D. Be optimistic.

E. Sleeping enough helps you maintain a normal weight. So do that.

F. Include characters you are uncomfortable writing when you write.

  1. You might make a new friend.
  2. Or learn something new about yourself.
  3. Or you might discover that people are not so different from one another, no matter what identities have been pinned to them (e.g. black, feminist, gay, conservative, stay-at-home mom).

G. Drink enough beer.

  1. But not too much beer.

H. Go swinging.

I. Take pictures.

  1. Of the garden.
  2. And other stuff, too.
in the morning

in the morning 

A Life Reflection — Back by Popular Request (the Obama Campaign and a Voluntaryism-ist)

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Apparently I am more enjoyable when writing about myself than anything else. Awesome. So I can just be a huge narcissist and people will read it up. (Get it? Like, instead of “eat it up?” Ha…ha…ha…).

Ok. There are so many things I could write about. Like, I worked for the Obama campaign in Colorado. I could write about that. Except I can’t really remember what happened. It’s just a blur of 90-or-so-hour weeks filled with calling people I didn’t know on the phone and having the same conversations over and over again. Not to suggest that I didn’t enjoy the repetition of conversations about whether Obama was ahead or behind in the polls, except, well, I didn’t.

I ate a lot of ramen. And a weird assortment of vegetables and one or two homemade pies provided by volunteers (no, I was not in the routine of baking anything given that I basically fell into bed every night). I lived with people who were wonderful Democratic supporters and we were all communal and familial and it was nice, if exhausting.

And about halfway through, they even gave me my own office — cool, right? My red county voted 40% for Obama, which was significantly better than predicted. Oh, rural folk, you are close to my heart.

In any case, it was an exciting deal. I like organizing things and having precise instructions. But it makes me wonder if I will ever have a long-term position in my life. Because most of what I’ve done thus far (professionally or in volunteer work) is bit-sized, small chunks of bigger projects.

Just now I was trying to think of the right parallel word for professionally in terms of volunteer work and it reminded me of a strange anarchist type person that I met in a pizza shop while I was registering voters. Of course, he and his brethren insisted they were voting for Gary Johnson, and by the end of the conversation he ended up sending me a link to the definition of the philosophy of “voluntaryism” that suggests all forms of human association in groups should be voluntary. It’s not a concept I’m completely at odds with, but then I also sort of think it’s a child’s philosophy (i.e. we should never have to do anything we don’t want to do), and I think there are real benefits to growing up (i.e. responsibility for one’s actions, making contributions to public goods even when we don’t really want to, etc). Granted, I have not read extensively about voluntaryism. But Wikipedia offers a offers a peak at it that only too clearly suggests it’s not much for social welfare. I’m pretty big on social welfare, social responsibility, that sort of thing.

What I’m really trying to show you is what my job was like, every day. When you start walking up to random people, registering them to vote, or trying to get them to actually follow through and vote, you open yourself up to all sorts of exposure to their ideas and world view. Sometimes they’re nice/thoughtful/grateful. Sometimes they’re opinionated/angry/confused. Almost always, if they open the door to having a conversation with you (literally or figuratively), people want to tell you what they think. And that is both interesting and occasionally mind-numbing.

If nothing else, I learned a great deal about things like voluntaryism, and I heard a great many personal stories about felons voting rights, veterans’ disabilities, shut-ins’ lives, oxygen tanks, illegal immigration, health care reform, Obama’s desire to alter the American flag, adoption, and religion.

So maybe I remember a few things.